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Thursday, 12 July 2018 | MYT 10:23 PM

Maria Chin: Drop all probes on Fadiah and abolish oppressive laws

PETALING JAYA: Maria Chin Abdullah has urged the Home Ministry and the police to drop all ongoing investigations against lawyer Fadiah Nadwa Fikri over an article questioning the institution of the monarchy in the country. 

“It must be made clear that this type of investigations have absolutely no place in Malaysia today. 

“The police have a duty to protect the citizens of Malaysia and not submit them to abusive laws that continue to taint the country’s image,” the Petaling Jaya MP said in a statement issued Thursday (July 12). 

In expressing outrage over ongoing investigations against Fadiah, Maria said this only goes to show that police intimidation is still very much alive in the country. 

“Although there may be disagreement with Fadiah's writing, there is no cause for her to be hauled twice for police investigation under the Peaceful Assembly Act and the Sedition Act,” she said. 

The former Bersih 2.0 chairman reiterated that the Pakatan Harapan election manifesto had promised that the Peaceful Assembly Act and Sedition Act will be abolised, as the two Acts were deemed to be violating human rights. 

“Moving towards a democratic Malaysia means that we must forge a clear pathway to end further human rights abuses. There should be no compromise on this.” 

“As a new government, we need to show leadership and abolish draconian laws such as the Peaceful Assembly Act and the Sedition Act with immediate effect,” she added. 

Maria also urged that the Independent Police Complaints and Misconduct Commission (IPCMC) to be implemented to restore integrity and respect for the police force. 

In a Facebook post on Thursday (July 12), Fadiah said she was called in for questioning by the police for the second time under Section 9(1) of the Peaceful Assembly Act, over a vigil held in solidarity for her. 

She was first questioned at IPD Brickfields on Wednesday (July 11), under Section 4(1) of the Sedition Act and Section 233 of the Communications and Multimedia Act. 

In a column titled “Don’t Kiss the Hand that Beats You” on a blog called Malaysia Muda, Fadiah had questioned the institution of the monarchy in the country, describing it as incompatible with democracy.