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Wednesday, 16 May 2018 | MYT 12:00 AM

Savouring sweet deals of yesteryear

A GROUP of Gen Z students from KDU Penang University College brought thousands of visitors back to the 80s during ‘Back to the 80s RM3 Fest’ at the Khoo Kongsi in Armenian Street, Penang.

They also enjoyed many local and traditional delicacies such as char koay teow, satay, nasi lemak, traditional Hokkien kuih, candied fruits and others at a flat rate of RM3.

Children and even adults also enjoyed the fun fair games such as ring toss, shoot the duck, duck fishing and other interesting games at the game stalls.

Many also learnt to make paper kites and soaps among others.

A hawker busy preparing fried bread snacks at one of the stalls.
A hawker busy preparing fried bread snacks at one of the stalls.

The visitors were also entertained by a traditional lion dance and Chinese orchestra performances.

Organising vice-chairman Kang Wan Ying said she initiated the event and worked together with her 45 Hotel Management and Culinary Arts Department coursemates to make it a success.

“Although I was born in 1996, I like songs and movies from the 80s as I was influenced by my family members.

A stall selling the popular Indian coconut milk apom at the fair.
A stall selling the popular Indian coconut milk apom at the fair.

“So, I thought of bringing people back to the past through this event,” said the second-year student.

Kang said the event was a project for one of the subjects they were taking, and they chose Khoo Kongsi as it is also one of the better known heritage buildings in Penang.

Organising chairman Joshua Lim said living the simple life was what mattered in those days as people communicated face to face, played traditional games with friends, and also the food and drinks were cheap.

Ng (in white) with her children Zilyn (right) and Teng How watching Lau Zhen Kuan, 21, (left) make paper kites.
Ng (in white) with her children Zilyn (right) and Teng How watching Lau Zhen Kuan, 21, (left) make paper kites.

“By creating or simulating the good old days, we want families, tourists and the community to reminisce or experience that forgotten time,” he said.

Spotted at the paper kite making booth was Sherlyn Ng, 32, and her two children Nyiew Zilyn, seven, and Nyiew Teng How, five.

Ng said it was nice to let her children experience what she used to enjoy.

“My daughter is interested in handicraft so she was curious to learn how to make paper kites,” she added.