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Thursday, 12 July 2018 | MYT 12:00 AM

Wantan mee stall keeps it traditional

FOR the past six years, a stall along Jalan Lazat 1 in Happy Garden off Jalan Klang Lama has served wantan mee the traditional way.

Loong Sifu Bamboo Noodle House owner Jeffrey Tan has used Cantonese artistry to make the noodles for many years, starting with a family business in Kuchai Lama before branching out on his own.

Tan said the noodles, a mix of flour, eggs and a little bit of soda, were made by pressing the ingredients together using a bamboo and running the dough through a machine to cut them into fine noodles.

The result is bouncy, thin strips of noodles that when cooked and mixed with oyster and eggplant sauce leaves it springy and light.

On an average day, Tan makes about 400 rolls of noodles and the number goes up to 800 during holidays.

The bamboo noodles comes with different sides from wanton, mushroom, chicken feet, char siew, shrimp roe, abalone, and steamed white chicken.
The bamboo noodles comes with different sides from wanton, mushroom, chicken feet, char siew, shrimp roe, abalone, and steamed white chicken.

For me, the wantan mee had an unfamiliar taste because I am used to the ones drenched in dark and sour sauce.

My food crawl buddies, however, thoroughly enjoyed their bowl of noodles.

The wantan mee comes with char siew and large wantan, which are my favourite. The wantan dumplings are packed with prawns and minced meat.

Customers can also opt for mushroom and chicken slices, chicken feet and mushrooms, shrimp roe, abalone, and steamed white chicken.

A small bowl of noodles is RM6.50, RM7.50 for the medium portion and RM8.50 for the large.

The sui gao (dumpling soup) is RM7.90.

Tan’s stall is very busy during the weekends so expect a long wait.

Loong Sifu Bamboo Noodle House is open from 7am to 4pm and is closed on Thursday fortnightly.